Zeichensaal

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At first sight, Zeichensaal is a photograph of an office. In this case, the office of Richard Verhölzer, an architect from Munich who was important in the post war reconstruction of Germany. It takes a few seconds and close examination to realise it is in fact a photograph of a model of the office, carefully and painstakingly reconstructed by the artist Thomas Demand from an original image. I saw it at Tate Liverpool yesterday.

It’s method is very post-modern. Like the work of Gursky it uses a trick to distance itself from reality. Whereas Gursky uses the digital manipulation of images, Demand reconstructs a real place to twist the perception of the viewer.

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3 Responses to “Zeichensaal”


  1. 1 Stephen Foster May 27, 2009 at 11:06 am

    We’re live in (at the least) a post-post-structural world now Elt.

    I’m no longer up to date with any of this stuff but I can tell you you’re a your a minimum of three periodising concepts behind the times here.

    Try to modernise.

  2. 2 Stephen Foster May 27, 2009 at 11:08 am

    FUK ME MY FIRST DRAFTS ARE SHOCKING, RATHER TAKING THE STING OUT OF MY “ATTITUDE.”

    Second Draft:

    We live in (at the very least) a post-post-structural world now, Mr Elt.

    I’m no longer up to date with any of this stuff but I can tell you that you’re a minimum of three periodising concepts behind the times.

    Please try to modernise.

  3. 3 markelt May 28, 2009 at 10:57 am

    The Onion did a list of their era defining moments from the Simpsons.

    No. 6. Homer meets Generation X (“Homerpalooza,” 1996)
    There may be a more succinct commentary on Generation X than the following exchange between two disaffected youths attending an outdoor rock show in “Homerpalooza”: “Oh, here comes that cannonball guy. He’s cool.” “Are you being sarcastic, dude?” “I don’t even know any more.” Throughout the episode, in which Homer tries to reconnect with a music scene that’s long since left him behind, the writers explore the generation gap between classic and “alternative” rockers—one hopelessly out of touch, the other beaten down by irony and the corporate-sponsored rebellion of events like Lollapalooza. Still, Homer does appreciate bands like Smashing Pumpkins selling misery to today’s youth: “You know, my kids think you’re the greatest. And thanks to your gloomy music, they’ve finally stopped dreaming of a future I can’t possibly provide.”


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